SPALD

 SPALD video

SPALD ASDAN and 9Vo

Purpose

Our ASDAN and 9Vo curriculum is designed to develop a sense of self-worth and valuing and acceptance of others and their differences. Students will also develop their ability to discuss, present their ideas, communicate, accept others' point of view, work as a team and solve problems. These programmes and qualifications will enable students to develop a range of skills that are invaluable when they start work and begin independent lives.
Through this curriculum we want to engender a curiosity about the world around them and the role that they play within it.


Key concepts that underpin the curriculum


ASDAN
• Working with Others
• Improving Own Learning and Performance
• Problem Solving
• Research
• Discussion
• Oral Presentation


9Vo
• Independence
• Preparing for working life
• Physical and emotional and social health
• Becoming a responsible citizen
• Becoming a confident individual
• Making a positive contribution to society
• Managing risk
• Embracing change
• Personal challenges


How does our curriculum shape learners?

 As a result, our students leave us with confidence to present and discuss on a wide range of issues and topics, improved team working, ability to focus their learning and development through use of action steps and plans along with problem-solving ability to prepare them for their next steps and the wider world. The ASDAN and Vo curriculum enables students to become accepting of others and their differences and a sense of self-worth and appreciation of the world around them and their place in society.

ACADEMIC END POINTS
Year 7  Through the Identity unit Year 7 students will develop their own sense of identity and think about what makes them unique. They will recognize and appreciate the sense of belonging to a learning community and help them think about their relationships and family history. They will also develop skills to express their opinion, learn how to discuss, negotiate and give and take criticism effectively. They will develop an understanding about ways of keeping themselves and others safe in their community. Through the Community topic, they will learn how to research and develop understanding about what their community has to offer. In the International unit they will discuss how we are all ‘citizens of the world’ and begin to appreciate the variety of languages, traditions and culture in our world. By the end of year 7 they will have completed a journey from self to community and on to the wider world.
Year 8 In year 8 we complete the journey to explore their own unique identities with the Citizenship unit focusing on Nationality, including history, heritage and traditions. Under the umbrella of ‘Health’ students will learn more about how their body works, healthy eating and risky behaviours to equip them to make appropriate personal choices. The year 8 ASDAN course is completed by learning about the role we play in the environment and understanding of environmental issues.
Year 9  In the Year 9Vo lessons, students will complete Entry Level Units from the Asdan PSD course. Students will explore the positive associations between physical activity and promotion of mental wellbeing, including as an approach to combat stress, the characteristics and evidence of what constitutes a healthy lifestyle, maintaining a healthy weight, including the links between an inactive lifestyle and ill health. Students will begin to understand the facts about legal and illegal drugs and their associated risks, including the link between drug use, and the associated risks, including the link to serious mental health conditions. Students will consolidate their learning on personal hygiene introduced in Year 8. Students will develop their knowledge regarding sexual health, sexual relationships and contraception as well as understanding the ramifications of starting a family in the ‘Preparing for Parenting’ unit. Students will begin to prepare for life beyond school with the ‘Preparation for Work’ and ‘Managing Money’ units. They will focus on developing a knowledge of handling bank accounts, expenditure and bills. They will learn to compose CVs and letters of application as well as reflecting on their own skills and qualities as a potential employee.
Year 10  In year 10 we start to assess the skills that they have been developing by accessing various challenges in a Personal Development Programme (Bronze Award). The projects they complete are varied and include study of a famous person, group research into organisations in the community that help us, using the library to gain information using problem solving skills and a presentation on a city in Britain. At the end of Year 10 a student will complete the assessment and achieve a Bronze Award, showing that they can work as a team, learn independently, cope with problems and use Maths, English and ICT.
Year 11  In Year 11 we focus on demonstrating a range of personal, key and employability skills, whilst broadening the students experience and link these to real life contexts. At the end of Year 11 they will have achieved a Certificate of Personal Effectiveness at Level 1, showing that they have evidence of working with others, improving own learning and performance, problem solving and provide evidence of the skills of research, discussion and presentation. These are completed through a variety of detailed projects including furnish a flat, organise a Year 7 competition and an illustrated country presentation.

Click on the image below to visualise the ASDAN and VO learner journey.

Asdan VO

 

Key features of learning

We aim to embed personal, key and employability skills across the 5-year curriculum. Our curriculum also encourages empathy and respect of others’ ideas and opinions. Students are encouraged to share their opinions in a safe and supportive environment. Students are given support to become more independent and make decisions for themselves.

What will you see in Lessons?

  • Low stakes practice of skills in a variety of ways eg matching activities, sorting activities.
  • Practical/kinasthetic activities to enhance understanding.
  • Use of visuals, including film clips.
  • Work sheets.
  • Opportunities to articulate and discuss thinking.
  • Specific practice of vocabulary informed by Elklan strategies eg word maps.
  • Encouragement to use visual aids.

What will you see in books?

  • Learning objectives phrased as questions.
  • Success criteria
  • Deliberate practice of skills and concepts, including red pen improvements.
  • The work in books is often completed after a range of low stakes practice; this takes place before pen and paper meet eg work on MWBs, matching games, sorting activities.

What formative assessment will you see?

A variety of tasks as detailed in the course books for these 2 programmes

SPALD English

Curriculum intent

  • To have uncompromising aspirations for every individual and for our school to be an exceptional and inspirational community of lifelong learners.

Purpose


To develop literacy skills in order to be able to access the rest of the curriculum and the world around them, through reading, writing, speaking and listening. Students are exposed to a broad experience of a range of accessible texts (bespoke to the cohort) which aim to develop their cultural capital in order to assist them to integrate and function in a wider society. Through English in Spald we want to foster a love of reading and writing in different forms and develop ways to express themselves and communicate with others. Key to this is enabling students to develop their language skills and vocabulary in order for them to be able to communicate effectively and function fully in society, equipped with literacy skills which will enable them to be successful in further education or careers, along with appropriate accreditation and qualifications.

Key concepts that underpin the curriculum

1 The Writer’s Craft
2 The Reader’s Response
3 Context
4 Genre
5 Spoken Language

 Key features of learning

Our lessons are very interactive with a wide range of activities, such as using mini white boards, ELKLAN strategies and games, which develop their reading, writing, speaking and listening skills. We use technology both in and outside the classroom to enhance the learning, for example, Quizlet to help students learn vocabulary or IDL where they independently work through a series of modules. Reading and literacy intervention including Dockside and Toe by Toe, delivered by TAs, are also used in conjunction with the class teaching.

How does our curriculum shape learners?


By reading and writing a wide range of genres and forms, students will be able to experience the world around them, allowing them to make more informed decisions in their own lives.
Beyond developing their language skills and literacy competence, we want learners to widen their cultural capital, become resilient learners, and equip them with life skills. This will include developing self-help and organisational strategies as well as resilience for life beyond school. In this way, the opportunities and life choices that they will have available to them will be widened.

ACADEMIC END POINTS

Year 7

By the end of year 7, students will have developed some confidence in speaking audibly and fluently and be able to participate in discussions well as listen and maintain attention. We aim to develop their love of reading through poetry, plays and novels, helping them to be able to read common words with fluency and accuracy. Not only should they be able to understand what is read and develop prediction and recall, but be starting to develop some ability to use inference and deduction. In terms of writing, students need to be able to spell common words, write and sequence sentences and use capital letters and full stops correctly in a variety of written forms. Students will also develop some knowledge of parts of speech, including identifying nouns, adjectives and verbs as well as some figurative language such as similes. They can produce short texts with some connectives and opinions and grow in confidence in developing their own personal response. There is also the opportunity to read a variety of rich literary and non-fiction texts, such as Macbeth, and be able to find evidence as well as begin to understand what a quotation is. Our ambition for our year 7 students is to feel confident and positive about their progress in their reading and writing and experience the joy of reading and discovering new things.

Year 8

By the end of year 8, students will continue to develop their confidence in speaking audibly and fluently and be able to participate in discussions well as listen and maintain attention. They will continue to develop their love of reading and be able to read less common words with fluency and accuracy. They will read more challenging texts including a Shakespeare play, speeches and myths and legends short stories and develop their use inference and deduction. In terms of writing, students need to be able to spell words of more than one syllable most of the time and write simple and compound sentences and use capital letters and full stops correctly, question marks and exclamation marks in new forms of writing including scripts and speeches. Students will also develop further their knowledge of parts of speech, including identifying nouns, adjectives, verbs and adverbs as well as re-visiting figurative language such as similes. They can produce longer texts with connectives and opinions clearly crafted. There is also the opportunity to find and explain what a quotation is and explore characters. By the end of year 8, students will have been able to practice and build on their reading and writing skills that they developed in year 7 and feel confident and ready to progress to year 9.

Year 9

This year focuses on developing their reading, writing and spoken language skills ready to access Entry Level in year 10. It is very much bespoke to the needs of the cohort. Through a variety of writing units, such as Room 101 and Alone in the Wild, they will develop a solid foundation of vocabulary and sentences structures to be successful at gaining an Entry Level qualification in year 10. They can write more extended texts which demonstrate application of the writer’s craft as learned throughout Key Stage 3 (including complex sentences) and further develop, use and build on a range of vocabulary which they have learned so far. Reading lessons, as well as the study of Romeo and Juliet and a novel will develop their cultural capital and vocabulary as well as developing their understanding of context, the audience’s response, and the analysis of character/theme, as well as provide the opportunity to practice the skills needed in both the literature and language GCSEs if appropriate at KS4. This bespoke curriculum can also incorporate a poetry unit (building on their work from year 7) to develop their ability to identify and use poetic devices. This will also further students’ abilities to decipher explicit and implicit meaning.

Year 10

In year 10, students follow a bespoke programme aimed at ensuring their enjoyment, understanding and progression in English. Students continue to develop their ability as clear and confident communicators, as a core life skill. Students experience a range of fiction and non-fiction texts, learning to identify and interpret information and ideas, both explicit and implicit; to evaluate and support their ideas with relevant textual reference; to summarise information; to develop an appreciation and understanding of how writers use language to craft meaning and to influence readers. We begin to consider the impact of context on texts and our response to them. Students will also develop their own craft as writers, their technical accuracy and understanding of writing for a specific audience and purpose. We seek to develop and embed strong literacy skills, increasing student’s range of vocabulary and sentence structures, alongside accurate spelling and punctuation. We believe that an appreciation of good literature underpins good writing skills and, although there is no formal assessment of English Literature, the syllabus incorporates literature for pleasure, and to add cultural capital.

Year

11

The skills acquired in Year 10 enable students to attain an Entry Level qualification, whilst building the necessary core skills to work towards English Language GCSE. Year 11 In Year 11, students will review and develop their language skills, learning to approach more sophisticated and complex texts, in preparation for English Language GCSE. The focus is primarily on building upon their skills of analysing unseen fiction and non-fiction texts, with an increasingly developed understanding of the writer’s craft and perspectives; implicit and explicit meaning; form, genre and structure; comparison of texts; and reader response. Students will also practice and refine their exam strategy. Students will become more confident in expressing their personal response to texts and develop their ability to do so using an appropriate voice. Students will continue to mature as writers, and to become assured communicators, both in writing and in oral communication.

 Click on the image below to visualised the SPALD English learner journey.

SPALD English

What will you see in Spald English Lessons?

  • Low stakes practice of skills in a variety of ways eg computer programmes, group games, matching activities, sorting activities.
  • Practical/kinasthetic activities to enhance understanding.
  • Use of visuals, including film clips.
  • Work sheets.
  • Opportunities to articulate and discuss thinking.
  • Specific practice of vocabulary informed by Elklan strategies eg word maps.
  • Encouragement to use visual aids.

What will you see in books?

  • Learning objectives phrased as questions.
  • Success criteria
  • Deliberate practice of skills and concepts, including red pen improvements.
  • The work in books is often completed after a range of low stakes practice; this takes place before pen and paper meet eg work on MWBs, matching games, sorting activities, computer games.

What formative assessment will you see?
• Quizzes
• Questioning (e.g. cold-calling).
• Written answers.
• End of topic tests. 

 






 

SPALD Geography

Purpose


Geography is a subject that will inspire a lifelong interest and curiosity about our world. The Geography Department believes that Geography is an essential ingredient in the development of our students as global citizens. In an age where our world is becoming a single global society, understanding and appreciation of this world is now more important than ever before. We want our students to be prepared for the world within which they will work and to be provided with information that will allow them to make informed decisions as global citizens and broaden their knowledge and culture capital.

 

Key concepts that underpin the Geography curriculum

1 Physical and Human Processes
2 Location
3 Spatial Awareness
4 Sense of Place
5 Environment and Sustainability
6 Cultural Awareness and diversity
7 Geo literacy and thinking geographically

Key Geographical skills that underpin the Geography curriculum

1 Collect, analyse and communicate data through fieldwork
2 Interpret a range of sources of geographical information e.g maps, globes, GIS and satellite photographs
3 Use Geographical Information Systems (GIS) to view, analyse and interpret places and data

How does our curriculum shape learners?

Through the dedication of staff and students in the Geography department, students leave with the transferable skills they need to be successful in all aspects of life. They are independent, reflective, team players and have a deep understanding of the world around them.

ACADEMIC END POINTS
Year 7 By the end of year 7, students will be able to describe the locations of a number of places in the world. They will be able to understand their sense of place, locally, nationally and globally by studying maps skills and the landscape of the UK. With regards to physical Geography, students will be able to identify key issues that our oceans are facing and formulate solutions to these problems. This is the start of our students learning journey to becoming global citizens and understanding global issues.
Year 8 By the end of year 8, students will be able to begin to explain their points and link to key contemporary case studies. Students will challenge stereotypes when studying ‘Africa and development’, bringing a further awareness of different cultures and the diversity of our human race. Students will be aware of global problems in the world and have thought about solutions and will be able to identify where in the world these issues arise.
Year 9 By the end of year 9, students will draw upon their prior knowledge of weather and climate to deep dive into the issues of climate change. They will be able to explain what climate change is and how it will impact people and the environment in the short and long term.
By the end of year 9, they will have explored and tackled some of the world's issues. They will have built upon their prior locational knowledge as well as cross curricular knowledge from other subjects such as RE, to understand different cultures.

 Click on the image below to visualise the SPALD Geography learner journey. 

SPALD Geo


  

Key features of learning

Geography teaches important life skills, personal learning, thinking skills, functional skills, as well as developing a critical way of thinking about the world. Employers are looking for quality people to invest in, and geography is a subject which explores the importance of the future. The curriculum at Hayes school is far more than lists of content, rather specific topics chosen to really broaden the mindset of our students and teach beyond the specification, allowing time for regular retrieval and application of prior knowledge, which enriches and broadens their long term memory.
Geography lessons allow students to develop the idea of what it is to be a Hayes learner by partaking in group work while collecting data in the field or communicating their opinion to others while respectfully listening to others.

What will you see in lessons?

  • Low stakes practice of skills in a variety of ways eg matching activities, sorting activities.
  • Practical/kinesthetic activities to enhance understanding.
  • Use of visuals, including film clips.
  • Work sheets.
  • Opportunities to articulate and discuss thinking.
  • Specific practice of vocabulary informed by Elklan strategies eg word maps.
  • Encouragement to use visual aids

What will you see in books?

  • Learning objectives phrased as questions.
  • Deliberate practice of skills and concepts, including red pen improvements.

The work in books is often completed after a range of low stakes practice; this takes place before pen and paper meet eg work on MWBs, matching games, sorting activities.


What formative assessment will you see in SPALD Geography?

• Quizzes
• Questioning (e.g. cold-calling).
• Written answers.
• End of topic tests. What is the department currently reading and why?

 

SPALD Learning Support

Purpose

To provide an opportunity to build and consolidate key skills in numeracy and literacy in order to underpin the Maths and English curriculum.

Key concepts that underpin the curriculum

• Independent learning
• Gain confidence and tackle problems
• Increase reading age
• Increase spelling age
• Increase understanding of counting principles
• Practice memorising arithmetic facts
• Develop number sense

How does our curriculum shape learners?

Students gain confidence to use their reading, spelling and mathematical skills across the curriculum, aiding their progress.
As a result, our students improve their literacy and numeracy skills, enabling them to better tackle their qualifications at the end of KS4.

ACADEMIC END POINTS
Year 7 LS lessons are made up of a three part structure, consisting of independent reading, IDL literacy and IDL numeracy. The IDL programmes are designed to allow the student to progress through the modules at their own pace, based on their attainment at each stage. Their achievement is monitored and stored throughout the online programme in order to allow them to further progress in year 8.
Year 8 LS lessons are made up of a three part structure, consisting of independent reading, IDL literacy and IDL numeracy picking up from where they left off in year 7. The IDL programmes are designed to allow the student to progress through the modules at their own pace, based on their attainment at each stage. Their achievement is monitored and stored throughout the online programme in order to allow them to further progress in year 9.
Year 9  LS lessons are made up of a three part structure, consisting of independent reading, IDL literacy and IDL numeracy picking up from where they left off in year 8. The IDL programmes are designed to allow the student to progress through the modules at their own pace, based on their attainment at each stage. The progress is monitored throughout the online programme providing a useful benchmark for the start of year 10.
Year 10  We continue the IDL literacy and numeracy programmes alongside a class reader. Students will be exposed to wider literature and cultural capital, in order to build up vocabulary and literacy skills applicable to Entry Level and GCSE.
Year 11  Students will continue to focus on building literacy skills through wider reading and a skills builder programme. Students will be exposed to wider literature, cultural capital, and vocabulary as well as build up skills that are applicable to Paper 1 and 2 on the language GCSE. It will also enable those that are taking the Literature GCSE to hone those skills too.

 

Key features of learning


We provide a variety of activities to aid students to become independent readers and writers through practice and consolidation of their skills. This programme is devised to be multi-sensory and develop links between auditory, visual and tactile pathways, in order to embed skills that are needed both for qualifications and success in the wider world.

What will you see in lessons?

  • Interactive computer programmes
  • Use of visuals, including film clips.
  • Work sheets.
  • Opportunities to articulate and discuss thinking.
  • Specific practice of vocabulary informed by Elklan strategies eg word maps.
  • Encouragement to use visual aids.

What will you see in books?

Key Stage 3:

  • Reading log
  • Independent work on reading activities

Key Stage 4:

  • Reading logs
  • Elklan activities
  • Literacy work

What formative assessment will you see?

This is monitored through the IDL programmes.

 

 

SPALD History

Curriculum intent 

To have uncompromising aspirations for every individual and for our school to be an exceptional and inspirational community of lifelong learners.

Purpose

Who does not love a good story? A tale of intrigue where the plot can twist and turn in ways that were not obvious at the start. History is a messy, complex study of humans whose decisions, personalities and flaws have helped shape our world today. Students will be guided along this path and, through the engagement with evidence from a wide range of sources, they can gain an understanding of how individuals and events have been represented in the past. Students will access a wide-ranging curriculum and are encouraged to discuss concepts and ideas to help them develop as critical thinkers.

Key concepts

 

1st order

2nd order concepts

1

Politics

Change and continuity

2

Economic

Causation and consequence

3

Social

Significance

4

Religious

Evidence/sources

5  

Historical interpretations

 

How does our curriculum shape learners?


We want to develop empathetic young people and challenge stereotypes. Our curriculum provides opportunities for students to be empathetic learners who are given opportunities to communicate their opinions. They are able to draw on their understanding of the past in order to become more aware of the challenges society is facing.

 

Academic end points
Year 7 By the end of year 7, students will have started to engage in historical enquiry focusing on the Ancient and Medieval Britain period exploring the different institutions that held power (monarchy, the church) and how they used this power. They will begin to be curious and ask questions about the past. They will start to use key historical terms in their writing.
They will have developed a foundational understanding of how the past has been interpreted and how and why interpretations about a particular event may differ.
They can start to critically investigate primary source material, looking at the content, origin and nature of the source in order to reach supported conclusions.
Year 8 By the end of year 8, students will have continued to engage in historical enquiry focusing on how and why different societies changed politically, socially and economically in the 17th to 19th centuries. They will continue to be curious and ask questions about the past. They will have continued to use key historical terms in their writing and do this with increased accuracy.
They will have continued to develop their understanding of how the past has been interpreted through the unit of the British empire.
By identifying differences and similarities between today and the past, they will make clear connections between their own lives and those of people in the past.
They will continue to critically investigate primary source material, looking at the content, origin and nature of the source in order to evaluate its validity.
Year 9 By the end of year 9, students will have confidently engaged in historical enquiry focusing on the causes and course of modern conflict. They will frequently ask questions about the past. They will continue to use historical terms in their writing.
They will have continued to embed their understanding of how the past has been interpreted and how different interpretations can be supported by a higher frequency of specific own knowledge. They will be able to evaluate the interpretations in order to reach their own reasoned conclusions about the validity of these views.
They will continue to build on the skills to more confidently, critically investigate primary source material, looking at the content, origin and nature of the source in order to evaluate its validity. They are able to explain, support or challenge the source with their specific own knowledge expanding on key quotes.

Click on the image below to visualise the History learner journey.

SPALD History
 
 

Key features of learning


We explore the past and the concepts of change and continuity, causation, interpretations, significance and evaluation are developed throughout our curriculum and through KS3. Our lessons are shaped through enquiry questions that focus on how and why events have occurred.
At KS3 we look to give students a broad understanding of change over time, introduce them to some of the key events and concepts from the past that we then revisit throughout the three years. We look to encourage them to enjoy learning about the past and to challenge their traditional conceptions of the past.


What will you see in History lessons?

  • Paired and class discussions, giving the students the opportunity to articulate and develop their thoughts and opinions. Students will have worksheets.
  • Visual aids
  • Clips
  • The use of Elklan strategies.

What will you see in books?

  • Lesson titles are framed as questions
  • Worksheets are used.
  • Scaffolded work, including missing word activities.

What formative assessment will you see in History?

• There will be a range of summative assessment used. Quizzes (Satchel one)
• Questioning (e.g. cold-calling)
• Written answers
• End of topic tests

What is the department currently reading and why?

These History books link to the topics taught:

  • Marc Morris: ‘The Norman Conquest’
  • Ian Mortimer: ‘A Time Traveller’s Guide to Medieval England’
  • Miranda Kaufmann: ‘Black Tudors’
  • Andrea Stuart: ‘Sugar in the Blood’
  • Hallie Rubenhold: ‘The Five’
  • Emma Griffin: ‘Liberty’s Dawn’
  • Fern Riddell: ‘Death in Ten Minutes’

 

 

 

SPALD Maths

Curriculum intent

To have uncompromising aspirations for every individual and for our school to be an exceptional and inspirational community of lifelong learners.

Purpose

Our Maths Curriculum in the Speech and Language Provision aims to develop an enjoyment and confidence in the subject as well as an understanding of how it is relevant to the students and the world around them. We aim to develop a thorough knowledge and understanding of the concepts in maths and a sound foundation of mathematical techniques through a range of learning opportunities inside and outside of the classroom. We aim to equip our students with a level of proficiency and confidence in maths which will serve them when encountering maths in a range of wider contexts outside the classroom and in their next steps after Hayes.
Key features of learning:
Practical interactive activities and the opportunities to practise mathematical skills in a variety of different ways is key to supporting the ways in which our students learn. We recognise the importance of regularly revisiting concepts and skills and returning to topics to deepen and support the further understanding of them over time.
Key concepts that underpin the curriculum:
1 Understanding maths as relevant to a range of real life contexts
2 Use of manipulatives, visuals and precise reading (RUCSAC) to aid problem solving
3 Verbal communication
4 Acquisition and practise of basic number skills
5 Acquisition and practise of mathematical terminology

How does our curriculum shape learners?


Our students often, although not always, have a level of anxiety around the subject of maths. The aim of our curriculum is to develop learners who have an enjoyment of maths, learners who will embrace a challenge, develop an understanding of how they learn and who have the confidence to give something a go. We aim to equip learners with a range of strategies eg visual, kinaesthetic so that they can develop their independence as well as an understanding of how they learn best. We provide opportunities for students to develop their ability to communicate with one another, to find ways to navigate social communication issues as they arise and to function successfully within a large secondary school and beyond.

Academic end points

Year 7 Students will begin to develop the ability to select the mathematics they use in some classroom activities as well as the visual/manipulatives to support their thought processes. Students are introduced to the idea of ‘precision reading’ in Maths and using RUCSAC to help them apply this skill when tackling worded Maths questions/problems. They will be able to discuss their work using some mathematical language and will begin to represent it using symbols and simple diagrams. Students will develop their ability to explain why an answer is correct. Students will be more at ease with making mistakes and seeing that as part of how they learn. Students will be able to count sets of objects reliably and use mental recall of addition and subtraction facts to 20. They will begin to understand the place value of each digit in a number and use this to order numbers up to 100. They will be able to choose the appropriate operation when solving addition, subtraction and multiplication problems. They will begin to use mental calculation strategies to solve number problems involving money and measures. They will recognise sequences of numbers, including odd and even numbers. They will use simple fractions that are one part of a whole. Students will be able to convert from pounds to pence and vice versa. They will be able to add amounts of money and give change. They will be able to read times to O’clock, half past, quarter past and quarter to on an analogue clock and can read anytime on a digital clock. Students will use mathematical names for common 2D and 3D shapes and describe their properties, including numbers of edges, faces and vertices. They will start to distinguish between straight and turning movements, understand angle as a measurement of turn, and recognise right angles in turns. Students will begin to use standard units to measure length and weight. Students will be able to sort objects and classify them using more than one criterion. When they have gathered information, they will be able to record results in simple lists, tables and block graphs in order to communicate their findings.
Year 8 AQA Entry Level Course First Year
By the end of Year 8, students will be able to try different approaches and find ways of overcoming difficulties that arise when they are solving problems. They will be more confident in choosing the correct mathematical operations to solve a problem and in selecting the resources which are most appropriate to support their working. Students will be able to use mathematical language more accurately and in the correct context. They will be beginning to organise their work and check results. Students will be developing their ability to discuss their mathematical work and are beginning to explain their thinking. Students demonstrate an understanding of the relationship between units of time and are developing accuracy in telling the time to the nearest 5 minutes. Students show an understanding of place value in numbers up to 1,000 and use this to make approximations. They begin to use decimal notation correctly and understand that amounts of money should have 2 decimal places. Students solve multi-step problems involving money and give answers in correct notation. Students extract and interpret information presented in simple tables and lists. They construct bar charts and pictograms, where the symbol represents more than one item to communicate information and they interpret information presented to them in these forms.
Year 9 AQA Entry Level Course Second Year

By the end of Year 9, students will show a greater confidence in selecting the correct mathematical techniques and resources to solve a problem. They will have a greater grasp of appropriate mathematical terminology and be able to use some subject specific vocabulary accurately when talking about maths. Students are becoming more adept at articulating their own thinking and also in listening to others without judgement.
They use and interpret mathematical symbols and diagrams. Students show understanding of place value in numbers up to 1,000 and use this to make approximations. They begin to use decimal notation and to recognise negative numbers, in contexts such as temperature. They add and subtract numbers with two digits mentally and numbers with three digits using written methods. They use mental recall of the 2, 3, 4, 5, 8 and 10 multiplication tables and derive the associated division facts. They solve whole number problems involving multiplication or division, including those that give rise to remainders. They use simple fractions that are several parts of a whole and recognise when two simple fractions are equivalent. Students classify 2D and 3D shapes in various ways using mathematical properties such as reflective symmetry for 2D shapes. They use standard metric units of length, capacity and weight and standard units of time, in a range of contexts.

Year 10 Level 1 Award: Working with Number and Measures

Students continue to develop their resilience and confidence to try different approaches and find ways of overcoming difficulties that arise when they are solving problems. They are beginning to organise their work with care and check results to ensure that their answers are logical. Students are able to articulate their ideas using correct mathematical terminology and to explain how they have arrived at an answer. They use and interpret mathematical symbols and diagrams.
Students are beginning to understand multiples, factors, common factors and prime numbers. They are developing their ability to multiply and divide decimals with up to two decimal places, converting between fractions and decimals and percentages. They are beginning to understand the relationship between simple fractions and percentages of quantities, sometimes in context.
They can work through problems relating to time, and can use a variety of units of measure for carrying out measurement and can convert between units of measure within the metric system. Students are developing an understanding of imperial measures alongside their existing knowledge of metric measures.
They can work out perimeters and areas relating to rectangles, and volumes of cuboids. They are developing their ability to calculate perimeters and areas of compound shapes. They can read, write and use everyday tables and charts, and draw simple graphs.
Students understand the relevance of unit measures to real life contexts eg recipes, journeys. Students can understand how to calculate elapsed time and solve a range related problems.

Year 11 Level 1 Award: Working with Number and Measures

Students are able to draw upon a range of strategies and practical resources to support them in overcoming difficulties that arise when they are solving problems in a variety of contexts. They are able to discern links between topics and to apply their learning across a range of contexts. They are able to articulate their thinking and discuss how they have reached an answer. Students can use correct mathematical terminology most of the time.
Students are able to use and interpret mathematical symbols as well as choosing the correct operation to solve a word problem using links to the vocabulary used and a practical visualisations eg drawing out the problem.
Students understand multiples, factors, common factors and prime numbers. They can multiply and divide decimals with up to two decimal places, converting between fractions and decimals and percentages. They understand the relationship between simple fractions and percentages of quantities.
Students can use a variety of units of measure for carrying out measurement and can convert between units of measure within the metric system. Students show an understanding of imperial measures as well as of metric measures.
They can work out perimeters and areas relating to rectangles, and volumes of cuboids. They can read, write and use everyday tables and charts, and draw simple graphs.
Students solve multi-step problems involving money and give answers in correct notation. Students can tackle a range of problems involving time and apply to real life scenarios eg reading train timetables.

 Click on the image below to visualise the Maths SPALD learner journey 

SPALD Maths

 

What will you see in Maths Lessons?

Low stakes practise of skills in a variety of ways eg computer games, group games, matching activities, sorting activities.

  • Practical activities to enhance understanding of mathematical concepts.
  • Use of manipulatives and visuals.
  • Opportunities to articulate and discuss thinking.
  • Specific practise of mathematical vocabulary informed by Elklan strategies eg word maps.
  • Encouragement to use visual aids and manipulatives.
  • Reference to RUCSAC to prompt ‘precision reading’.

What will you see in Maths books?

Deliberate practise of skills and concepts.

The work in books is often completed after a broad range of low stakes practise; this takes place before pen and paper meet eg work on MWBs, matching games, sorting activities, computer games.

What formative assessment will you see in Maths?

  • Entry Level Component style tests.
  • MWBs
  • Questioning
  • Purple pen feedback on written work
  • Verbal feedback
  • Baseline topic assessments to inform PLCs

 

 

 

 

SPALD Religious Studies

Curriculum intent

To have uncompromising aspirations for every individual and for our school to be an exceptional and inspirational community of lifelong learners.

Purpose

The purpose of RE is to develop thoughtful, compassionate, reflective and well-informed students and to enable them to ask questions from a critical, curious and analytical perspective. Students are provided with the opportunity to acknowledge and evaluate perspectives different to their own in order to develop an open-minded approach. Their own thoughts, opinions and views are nurtured, along with the ability to justify them with well-informed knowledge.

Key concepts that underpin the R.E Curriculum

 

Key concepts that underpin the curriculum

Skills 

1

Cultural awareness/global thinker

Extracting Key messages and meaning/interpretation

Research skills

Analytical/Evaluative and critical thinking skills

Empathy

2

Vocabulary

3

Religious sources

4

Diversity, identity and belonging

5

Religious beliefs

6

Religious practices

 

How does our curriculum shape learners?

The study of R.E develops a wider knowledge and understanding of global values and promotes a person's spiritual moral and ethical curiosity. The curriculum engages students’ curiosity when looking into different religious and non-religious views. It enables them to be empathetic, understanding and considerate when applying their learning within the wider world.

Academic end points
Year 7 By the end of year 7 students will have a foundational awareness of the different ways that people express their religious practices and values, including an awareness of diverse religious experiences with a focus on Hinduism, Sikhism and Buddhism, building upon their cultural awareness, and broaden their world view.They will have knowledge of artefacts and texts associated with different religious and non-religious traditions in the Eastern tradition and be able to use the appropriate vocabulary to begin to express their significance to different followers.Students will start to develop the ability to see the differences and similarities within and between religions. For example students will be able to identify key concepts which underpin the three dharmic religions, e.g. Dharma Karma and reincarnation.
Year 8 By the end of year 8 building on the skills and prior knowledge acquired in year 7 students will be able to confidently compare and contrast the Abrahamic religions. They will begin to use subject specific vocabulary more frequently to discuss the diversity within religions. Students will have drawn upon their knowledge from History to further consolidate their understanding the Church. They will have an awareness of the impact the history of a religion has on society and how it is practised today.They will begin to refer to scripture to support their knowledge and identify the significance of the prophets to followers and start to articulate their own opinions about religion. Students will be able to identify how religious beliefs and practices shape cultural values and behaviours. In light of this knowledge their cultural awareness will further deepen.
Year 9

By the end of the year 9 students will have built on their foundational knowledge of Christianity and Islam and will know Christianity is one of the diverse religious traditions in Great Britain today and that the main religious tradition in Great Britain is Christianity. Students will continue to refer to scripture and/or sacred texts where appropriate to support Christian views.Students will frequently refer to subject specific vocabulary that is applicable to the religious tradition.Students will continue to develop an understanding of religious teachings, and religious, philosophical and ethical arguments, relating to conflict and war and their impact and influence in the modern world for example the Syrian Crisis and terrorism. They will be aware of contrasting perspectives in contemporary British society surrounding peace and conflict.Students will begin to articulate points of view and give reasons.

 

 Click on the image below to visualise the Religious Studies learner journey

SPALD RS

Key features of learning


We aim to embed key vocabulary and skills necessary for critical evaluation. Students’ disciplinary expression and vocabulary is developed across the key stages to enable them to pursue the study of R.E and engage in academic discourse around the concepts. Our curriculum also encourages empathy and respect of others’ ideas. Students are encouraged to share their opinions in a safe and supportive environment, as well as developing the ability to structure an argument in a reasonable and logical way.

What will you see in R.E. lessons?

  • Every lesson will start with a reference to previous lesson or beyond
  • Paired and class discussions, giving the students the opportunity to articulate and develop their thoughts and opinions. Students will have worksheets.
  • Visual aids
  • Clips will be from a broad range of sources used to help develop students understanding
  • There will be reference to PEPE written answers where appropriate.
  • Clips
  • The use of Elklan strategies.

What will you see in books?

Worksheets are used.
Scaffolded work, including missing word activities.


What formative assessment will you see in R.E. ?

• There will be a range of summative assessment used. Quizzes (Satchel one)
• Questioning (e.g. cold-calling).
• Written answers
• End of topic tests.